Tag Archives: car safety

Playing it Safe with Kids and Cars

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Did you know 3 out of every 4 car seats are used incorrectly? According to safercar.gov, parents haven’t been doing enough to keep their kids safe on the road, which has resulted in vehicle crashes becoming one of the leading causes of death for children between 1 and 13 years old.

In order to combat these sobering statistics, NHTSA provides an informative booklet aimed at getting parents prepared for life on the road with their children. Available online in PDF form here, the information equips parents with useful knowledge such as what features you should look for in buying a car, which types of car seats you should use and how to properly do so and child safety scores for nearly every vehicle available today.

We highly recommend that every driver who has children or is planning on having children take a look give this booklet a read and keep it handy for future reference. Here are some highlights from the publication:

Car safety features

NHTSA advises that you should ensure that a car has the following safety features if it is on your shopping list. Each one serves a specific purpose in making sure accidents, both minor and major, don’t occur and, if they do, injury is minimized.

– Automatic door locks: Auto door locks, which engage when a vehicle reaches a certain speed (usually 10 or 20 mph), can prevent accidental door openings in a moving vehicle and the can lower the risk of ejection in the event of a crash.

– Push down/pull-up window switches: These minimize accidental window closure and prevent injury in the car. Older, rocker-type window can shut windows inadvertently if leaned on, trapping fingers and limbs.

– Advanced frontal air bags: These new types of air bags can sense the presence of a child and will shut off in the event of a crash or mitigate their release to minimize harm. NHTSA advises that kids should always sit in the back, but in the event that the front seat is the only one available, these air bags will keep your child as safe as possible.

– Side impact air bags: These air bags deploy during side impact crashes and when they do, they deploy very quickly. So while they can be helpful in preventing injury, they can also cause injury to smaller children. NHTSA says you shouldn’t allow your kids to lean against the area where these air bags are stored.

– Anti-pinch/auto-reverse windows: These windows are designed to reverse direction if they’re closing and sense something is in the way, eliminating the risk of body parts getting pinched or trapped.

– Trunk release levers: Most vehicles have this equipped. It allows someone to get out if they become trapped in the trunk.

– Rearview cameras: These will likely become mandated by law in the near future, but until then, they’re an important safety option available on many cars or from aftermarket companies. They allow you to see a wide field of view while backing up.

Car seat 101

Given that three out of four car seats are being used incorrectly, according to NHTSA, the booklet focuses a good deal on getting that practice correct. From installation to daily use, car seats require proper attention and care in order to work correctly and safely.

Here are some tips to get you started:

– Read the car seat manual and you vehicle’s owner’s manual. Every vehicle and car seat is different, so it’s very important that you familiarize yourself with their installation and use instructions before you do anything at all.

– Place the car seat in the back seat.

– Secure it very tightly to the vehicle. It shouldn’t move side-to-side or front-to-back more than 1 inch when pulled at the belt path.

– If you have a forward-facing seat with a top tether trap, connect it to the tether anchor and tighten. It’s imperative that you do so, as it limits head movement in a crash.

– If you have a rear-facing sear, make sure it’s installed at the correct recline angle. Most seats have angle indicators or adjustors that help you do so.

– Make sure your child is fitting correctly in the car seat after you’ve done proper installation. To do so, ensure that the harness is properly placed (lying flat, not twisted), the harness is buckled and tightened and the chest clip is at armpit level.

For more tips on child safety, head over to safercar.gov and get the full download. The site also has information on everything from combating distracted driving to driving in bad weather. Take some time out of your day and help make yourself a safer driver. You, your passengers and your fellow drivers will all benefit.

If you should have any questions about installing a car seat in your Nissan, please call the service department at Windsor Nissan, and our friendly staff will be able to assist you.

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Buying a new car? Here’s what you should know…

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Windsor Nissan has some friendly advice for those new car buyers.  If you are thinking of buying or leasing a car, there’s a lot to consider before you make a final decision.

First, you need to decide what type of car will fit your needs and your budget. With so many choices available in the car market, setting a budget first helps you narrow down your search based on what you can afford. 

Other important considerations include safety measures, fuel economy, and the credibility of the dealer or individual selling you the vehicle.

  • SAFETY:  Many tests are done on car safety before any vehicles hit the roads. The National Highway Traffic safety Administration (NHTSA) and Insurance Institute for Highway Safety are just two places you can check a car’s safety rating and features.  You can also find out from NHTSA if a vehicle has been recalled for safety defects.
  • TITLE:  If you’re buying from an individual seller, it is important to check on the title to make sure you are working with the actual vehicle owner.  You can check on the title with your local Better Business Bureau. If you are buying from a dealer, you can check their credibility with your local consumer affairs office.
  • LEASING:  If you are considering leasing a car, make sure you ask the dealer for all of the financial information up front, including details on wear and tear standards, if there is a limit on how many more miles you can drive a year, the manufacturers warranty and more.
  • FINANCING:  Whether you’re leasing or buying a car, most people have to do some type of financing when purchasing a vehicle. Two common types are direct lending or dealership financing.  It’s important to do your research so you know which types of financing is right for you.  The Federal Trade Commission explains your options and defines financing lingo so you can be prepared.

And of course, if you have any questions about a vehicle purchase, you can always contact a sales representative at Windsor Nissan, and they will be able to help you.

Child Passenger Safety Week!

Car crashes are the number one killer of children 1 to 12 years old in the United States. The best way to protect them in the car is to put them in the right seat, at the right time, and use it the right way.

There are so many car seat types and models, how do you know which one is right for your child? The right car seat or booster fits your child and your car, and is one you will use correctly every time you travel. Not only will your child ride as safely as possible, you will be establishing the foundation for a lifelong habit of seat belt use every time your child travels.

Is your child in the right car seat?
*Thank yo to safercar.gov for this article!
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